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A Failed Coup… An Unrecognized Republic… And Triggers for a Global Economic Meltdown

Turkish army tanks roll past a portrait of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder of modern Turkey, during a military parade on the 86th anniversary of Victory Day in Ankara, August 30, 2008. Tensions between Turkey's government and its powerful generals will continue clouding the future of the European Union-applicant country, after the new military commander warned against the rising profile of Islam. REUTERS/Fatih Saribas (TURKEY)

Turkish army tanks roll past a portrait of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder of modern Turkey, during a military parade on the 86th anniversary of Victory Day in Ankara, August 30, 2008. Tensions between Turkey’s government and its powerful generals will continue clouding the future of the European Union-applicant country, after the new military commander warned against the rising profile of Islam. REUTERS/Fatih Saribas (TURKEY)

  • A Failed Coup… An Unrecognized Republic… And Triggers for a Global Economic Meltdown
    by Nick Giambruno, Senior Editor, http://www.internationalman.com/  
    The country is one giant powder keg… and the fuse is already lit. I’m talking about Turkey. When the next global crisis explodes, there’s a good chance Turkey will be involved somehow.

    Turkey was founded from the ashes of the Ottoman Empire. It’s where Europe meets Asia. Naturally, it’s a geopolitically significant country. Today, it’s at the epicenter of many crises that are destabilizing the world… the migrant disaster in Europe, the ongoing carnage in Iraq and Syria, the conflict with ISIS, and the new Cold War with Russia.

    In light of all these potential triggers for a global meltdown—as well as the recent failed military coup d’état—I think it’s time to take a closer look at Turkey.

    Bad Blood
    There’s one aspect of Turkey and its myriad of crises that nobody is talking about. That brings us to Greece, Turkey’s historical rival, and where a number of the coup plotters fled after their recent failed putsch. It’s no secret that the Greeks and Turks have been at each other’s throats since at least the 16th century.


    It’s a rivalry of historic proportions because, literally since the days of Homer, most of what is now Western and Southern Turkey had been populated by Greeks. That started changing with the Ottoman conquest of the 16th century, and after World War I, when Turkey ethnically cleansed the area by deporting hundreds of thousands of Greeks and stripping them of their ancestral homes without compensation.

    read more.

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July 21, 2016 - Posted by | Economics, GeoPolitics | , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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